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CITES CoP16, Bangkok, Thailand, March 3-14 2013
THE SUSTAINABLE USE GUIDE
TO THE SPECIES PROPOSALS AND WORKING DOCUMENTS
This quick reference guide has been prepared by Safari Club International and Safari Club International Foundation as a service to delegates to CoP16, to provide the sustainable use view on the issues before the Parties. We thank Dr Hank Jenkins and Creative Conservation Solutions for their very substantial contribution to this guide, particularly in relation to non-game animals and plants. Safari Club International protects the freedom to hunt and promotes wildlife conservation worldwide. Safari Club International Foundation funds and manages worldwide programs dedicated to wildlife conservation, outdoor education and humanitarian services, and in the last 10 years has provided over $50 million to programs around the world. Creative Conservation Solutions was established by Dr Hank Jenkins to provide advice and technical assistance to Governments and the private sector on implementation of the Convention and sustainable use of wildlife. Dr Jenkins was the Chair of the CITES Animals Committee from 1992 until 2000. SPECIES PROPOSALS VOTING RECOMMENDATIONS - SUMMARY
KEY:
SUPPORT; REJECT;  PART SUPPORT PART REJECT; [ ] QUALIFIED

PROPOSAL VOTE
PROPOSAL VOTE PROPOSAL VOTE
Key: CoP = Conference of the Parties; SC = Standing Committee; AC = Animals Committee; PC = Plants Committee; WG = Working Group

SPECIES PROPOSALS
PROPOSAL
RECOMMENDATION
1. ABRUZZO CHAMOIS
Proponent: Denmark (on behalf of the EU) SUPPORT
(Rupicapra pyrenaica ornata)
Transfer from Appendix I to Appendix II. • The proposal follows evaluation under the Periodic Review of the Appendices. • Meets some of the criteria for inclusion in Appendix I (small wild population and restricted range) but its geographic range is expanding and populations are increasing due to active management, reintroductions and protection. • Unlikely that a continued Appendix I listing would contribute to the conservation of this subspecies. 2. VICUÑA (Vicugna vicugna) Proponent: Ecuador
Very successful repopulation program.
PROPOSAL
RECOMMENDATION
• No longer satisfies the criteria for inclusion in Appendix I.
• Continued listing may adversely affect further management
and conservation of the species.
• A transfer to Appendix II would permit trade in fiber and
manufactured products, delivering economic benefits to
indigenous peoples.

Proposal endorsed by all range States.
3. POLAR BEAR (Ursus
Proponent: USA
maritimus)
Transfer from Appendix II to Appendix I. Rejected at CoP15, and supporting statements show no
material difference from the prior proposal.

The proposal is based on projections suggesting extinction
due to habitat loss (melting sea ice); the Secretariat notes that
the Appendix I listing criteria regarding population decline
requires an existing, not a projected, decline.
The species is well-managed and the current trade is
sustainable.
PROPOSAL
RECOMMENDATION

The proposal may adversely affect conservation of the
species by restricting management options.

The majority of range States, including Canada, Norway
and Denmark (Greenland) do not support the proposal.
These range States exported 98% of total gross exports in
large polar bear items in the past 10 years (CoP16 Prop. 3 –
p.25, Table 3).
• The Inuit of Canada recommend rejection of the proposal
for the following reasons:
 The global population of polar bears is estimated to be in the range of 20-25,000;  Canada’s polar bear population is now estimated at 16,000;  International trade in polar bear parts/hides derived from the Inuit harvest of Canada’s polar bear populations has consistently been maintained within sustainable levels and this has not changed since CoP15;  On average, Inuit harvest 600 polar bears annually which falls between 2.5% to 3% percent of the global PROPOSAL
RECOMMENDATION
polar bear population and 3.75% of Canada’s polar bear population;  Out of the 600 polar bears harvested by Inuit in Canada, 300 of these enter into trade on average per year, which represents between 1.2% to 1.5% of the global polar bear population and less than 2% of Canada’s polar bear population;  The trade of polar bear specimens is derived from the annual Inuit subsistence harvest, which is regulated through legal agreements and co-management regimes that ensure the yearly harvest is sustainable and within conservation parameters;  The conservation based co-management regimes and the Inuit subsistence harvest as such ensure that the polar bear harvest will not be influenced by trade and market pressures;  Globally and within Canada, the polar bear populations are high in number and have been increasing since the early 1970s; PROPOSAL
RECOMMENDATION
 The habitat range of the polar bear covers a very large area across the circumpolar arctic region;  The changes in sea-ice has been on-going in the Arctic for a number of years, but there is no indication from Inuit observation and science research that these changes are causing a significant decline in the polar bear population;  Inuit have been directly witnessing the effects of climate change in the Arctic as well as an increasing number and presence of polar bears;  To summarise the Inuit view, harvesting and trade of polar bear is conservation driven and has remained within sustainable levels and therefore does not overall pose a harvesting and trade threat to the species. There has not been a significant decline, but an increase in the species population over the past 40 years. The population number is high and the species uses a very large habitat range on a circumpolar level. Inuit are not witnessing a significant decline of polar bear due to climate change in the Arctic. PROPOSAL
RECOMMENDATION
4. DUSKY FLYING-FOX
Proponent: Australia
WITHDRAW
(Pteropus brunneus)
• The proposal follows evaluation under the Periodic Review of the Appendices.
• P. brunneus is no longer considered a valid species and so
does not meet the criteria for inclusion in Appendix II.
• On account of taxonomic conflict, the more appropriate
course would be to amend Res. Conf. 12.11 (Rev. CoP15) on
standard nomenclature to exempt P. brunneus from the
standard mammal reference.

5. TASMANIAN TIGER
Proponent: Australia
(Thylacinus cynocephalus)
• Does not meet the criteria for inclusion in Appendix I (thought to be extinct). • No need to move to Appendix II as a precautionary measure given the status of the species. • Consistent with AC recommendation on Periodic Review of the Appendices. PROPOSAL
RECOMMENDATION
6. CRESCENT NAILTAIL
Proponent: Australia
WALLABY (Onychogalea
lunata)
• Does not meet the criteria for inclusion in Appendix I (thought to be extinct). • No need to move to Appendix II as a precautionary measure given the status of the species. • Consistent with AC recommendation on Periodic Review of the Appendices. 7. BUFF-NOSED RAT-
Proponent: Australia
KANGAROO (Caloprymnus
campenstris)
• Does not meet the criteria for inclusion in Appendix I (thought to be extinct).
• No need to move to Appendix II as a precautionary
measure given the status of the species.
• Consistent with AC recommendation on Periodic Review
of the Appendices.


PROPOSAL
RECOMMENDATION
8. PIG-FOOTED
Proponent: Australia
BANDICOOT (Chaeropus
ecaudatus)
• Does not meet the criteria for inclusion in Appendix I • No need to move to Appendix II as a precautionary measure given the status of the species. • Consistent with AC recommendation on Periodic Review of the Appendices. 9. LESSER RABBIT-EARED
Proponent: Australia
BANDICOOT (Macrotis
leucura)
• Does not meet the criteria for inclusion in Appendix I • No need to move to Appendix II as a precautionary measure given the status of the species. • Consistent with AC recommendation on Periodic Review of the Appendices. PROPOSAL
RECOMMENDATION
10. WHITE RHINOCEROS
Proponent: Kenya
(Ceratotherium simum simum)
Range State with over 95% of the population, South Africa,
Ceratotherium simum simum as follows: • The Secretariat has confirmed that South Africa has put in “Ceratotherium simum simum (Only the place measures to prevent trophies taken by traders populations of South Africa and Swaziland; pretending to be trophy hunters (“pseudo-hunting”) from Appendix I. For the exclusive purpose of allowing international trade in live animals to • The Standing Committee Working Group on rhinoceroses appropriate and acceptable destinations and and the Secretariat do not recommend that trophy hunting be hunting trophies. Hunting trophies from South discontinued but that “South Africa should maintain its Africa and Swaziland shall be subject to a rigorous approach to screening destination countries’ zero export quota until at least CoP18. All willingness and ability to monitor the movement of rhino horn, and all other CITES Parties should adopt a similar specimens of species included in Appendix I and the trade in them shall be regulated The economic returns available to private landowners from
trophy hunting have contributed significantly to the recovery
of this species. If they are removed, even for a short period,
private landowners may decide that the cost of protecting the
individual animals from poachers is not viable.
See also CoP16 Doc. 54.
PROPOSAL
RECOMMENDATION
11. AFRICAN ELEPHANT
Proponent: Tanzania
THIS PROPOSAL HAS BEEN WITHDRAWN
(Loxodonta africana)
Transfer the population of the African elephant, Loxodonta africana of the United Republic of Tanzania (URT) from Appendix I to Appendix II with an annotation as follows: “for the exclusive purpose of the following: a) trade in hunting trophies for non-commercial purposes; b) trade in registered raw ivory (whole tusks and pieces) subject to the following: i. a one-off sale of 101,005.25 kilograms from registered government-owned stocks, originating in Tanzania (excluding seized ivory and ivory of unknown origin); ii. only to trading partners that have been already designated by the Standing Committee, as having sufficient national legislation and domestic trade controls to ensure that the imported ivory will not be re- PROPOSAL
RECOMMENDATION
exported and will be managed in accordance with all requirements of Resolution Conf. 10.10 (Rev. CoP15) concerning domestic manufacturing and trade. These are Japan designated as a trading partner at the 54th meeting (Geneva, October 2006), and China designated as a trading partner at the 57th meeting (SC57, Geneva, July 2008); iii. not before the Secretariat has verified the registered government-owned stocks; iv. the proceeds of the trade are used exclusively for elephant conservation, community conservation and development programmes within or adjacent to the elephant range in Tanzania; v. Tanzania will not present further proposals to allow trade in elephant ivory from its population in Appendix II to the Conference of the Parties for the period from CoP16 and ending four years from the date of the single sale of ivory that is to take place in accordance with provisions in paragraphs b) i), b) ii), b) iii), b) iv). PROPOSAL
RECOMMENDATION

In addition such further proposal shall be
dealt with in accordance with Decisions 14.77
and 14.78.
c) trade in raw hides including foot, ears and
tails;
d) trade in live animals to appropriate and
acceptable destinations, as defined in
Resolution Conf. 11.20;
The Standing Committee can decide to cause
the trade in a), b), c) and d) above to cease
partially or completely in the event of non-
compliance by exporting or importing
countries, or in the case of proven detrimental
impacts of the trade on other elephant
populations as may be proposed by the CITES
Secretariat. All other specimens shall be
deemed to be specimens of species included
in Appendix I and the trade in them shall be
regulated accordingly.”

PROPOSAL
RECOMMENDATION
12. AFRICAN ELEPHANT
Proponent: Burkina Faso and Kenya
(Loxodonta africana)
Amend the annotation for Loxodonta • The proponents suggest that there was a misunderstanding africana as follows (additional text at CoP14 regarding the extent of the moratorium, and that the underlined, deleted text struck through): amendment is intended to correct that misunderstanding. However, it is not credible, given the prominence of the issue h) no further proposals to allow trade in and expertise available to the Parties, that the wording considered and adopted at CoP14 was a mistake. already in Appendix II shall be submitted to the Conference of the Parties for the period • The current annotation means the nine-year moratorium on from CoP14 and ending nine years from the elephant ivory sales agreed at CoP14 applies only to those date of the single sale of ivory that is to take countries with elephants listed in Appendix II at the time of CoP14 (Zimbabwe, South Africa, Namibia and Botswana). paragraphs g) i), g) ii), g) iii), g) vi) and g) vii). In addition, such further proposals shall • The amendment would extend the moratorium to any other be dealt with in accordance with Decisions country with elephants transferred from Appendix I to
• Parties should be free to submit proposals at any time in
response to changes in the status of the species without
restriction (Article XV of the Convention). The other parties
may then consider whether the proposal should be approved,
given the evidence provided.

PROPOSAL
RECOMMENDATION
13. WEST AFRICAN
Proponent: Benin, Senegal and Sierra
MANATEE (Trichechus
senegalensis)
• Data suggest that the criteria for Appendix I listing are Transfer from Appendix II to Appendix I.
• Population fewer than 10,000, increasing anthropogenic
threats and illegal trade in meat and by-products.


14. GUADALUPE
Proponent: Mexico
CARACARA (Caracara
lutosa)
• Assessed by the AC under Periodic Review of the
• Species thought to be extinct.
• AC should review the treatment of the higher taxonomic
listing, FALCONIFORMES spp., in Appendix II.
15. SONNERAT’S
Proponent: Switzerland (at the request of
JUNGLEFOWL (Gallus
sonneratii)
• Assessed by the AC under Periodic Review of the PROPOSAL
RECOMMENDATION

• No longer meets criteria for Appendix II listing.
• Regulation of trade not necessary as there is no indication it
would lead to inclusion in Appendix I.
• No “look-alike” concerns.

16. BLOOD PHEASANT
Proponent: Switzerland (at the request of
(Ithaginis cruentus)
• Assessed by the AC under Periodic Review of the
• No longer meets criteria for Appendix II listing.
• Regulation of trade not necessary as there is no indication it
would lead to inclusion in Appendix I.
• No “look-alike” concerns.
17. IMPERIAL PHEASANT
Proponent: Switzerland (at the request of
(Lophura imperialis)
• No longer recognised as a species – it is a hybrid between Lophura edwardsi and Lophura nycthemera. PROPOSAL
RECOMMENDATION

• Transfer to Appendix II is not necessary as the hybrid will
continue to benefit from the Appendix I status of Lophura
edwardsi
(Res. Conf. 10.7 (Rev. CoP14).

18. CASPIAN SNOWCOCK
Proponent: Switzerland (at the request of
(Tetraogallus caspius)
• Assessed by the AC under Periodic Review of the Transfer from Appendix I to Appendix II. Appendices.
• Does not meet the biological criteria for Appendix I.
• Although there is no legal trade in the species, the transfer
to Appendix II will enable the Parties to monitor the effect of
the removal from Appendix I.
19. TIBETAN SNOWCOCK
Proponent: Switzerland (at the request of
(Tetraogallus tibetanus)
• Asessed by the AC under Periodic Review of the Transfer from Appendix I to Appendix II.
• Does not meet the biological criteria for Appendix I.
• Although there is no legal trade in the species, the transfer
PROPOSAL
RECOMMENDATION

to Appendix II will enable the Parties to monitor the effect of
the removal from Appendix I.

20. ATTWATER’S
Proponent: Switzerland (at the request of
GREATER PRAIRIE-
CHICKEN (Tympanuchus
• Assessed by the AC under Periodic Review of the cupido attwateri)
Transfer from Appendix I to Appendix II.
• Meets the biological criteria of Appendix I, but there is no
trade in the species.

21. IMPERIAL
Proponent: Mexico
WOODPECKER
(Campephilus imperialis)

• Species is thought to be extinct.
• No need to move to Appendix II as a precautionary
measure given the status of the species.


PROPOSAL
RECOMMENDATION
22. LAUGHING OWL
Proponent: New Zealand
(Sceloglaux albifacies)
• Assessed by the AC under Periodic Review of the Appendices.

• Species is thought to be extinct.
23. AMERICAN
Proponent: Colombia
SUPPORT (WITH ANNOTATIONS)
CROCODILE (Crocodylus
acutus)
Transfer the population of the Bay of Cispata, • IUCN/SSC Crocodile Specialist Group recommends municipality of San Antero, Department of annotation of the proposal regarding how the project will be • Proponent should clarify whether safeguards in the proposal document (para 8.6) relate to this proposal or are a framework for future commercial management. • Consider a zero export quota until the Parties approve a harvest regime and regulatory controls for commercial use of the resource, given that the population level is poorly defined and there is commercial use of captive-bred specimens. PROPOSAL
RECOMMENDATION
24. SALTWATER
Proponent: Thailand
WITHDRAW OR REJECT
CROCODILE (Cocodylus
porosus)
Transfer the population of Thailand from • Biological criteria for Appendix I list remain satisfied and Appendix I to Appendix II with a zero quota • All trade is from captive-bred, not wild specimens. 25. SIAMESE CROCODILE
Proponent: Thailand
WITHDRAW OR REJECT
(Crocodylus siamensis)
Transfer of the population of Thailand from • Biological criteria for Appendix I list remain satisfied and Appendix I to Appendix II with a zero quota • All trade is from captive-bred, not wild specimens. 26. NEW ZEALAND GREEN
Proponent: New Zealand
GECKOES (Naultinus spp.)
• Criteria for Appendix II satisfied (trade data, status and trends of wild population, and lookalike concerns). • Illegal collection for the international pet trade has not been resolved by an Appendix III listing. PROPOSAL
RECOMMENDATION
27. MANGSHAN PIT-VIPER
Proponent: China
QUALIFIED SUPPORT
(Protobothrops
mangshanensis)
• However, it is unclear whether the species is protected in China – approval should be conditional on clarification of the legal status of the species by the Chinese Management Authority. 28. ROTI ISLAND SNAKE-
Proponent: USA
NECKED TURTLE
(Chelodina mccordi)
Transfer from Appendix II to Appendix I. • There is no population data available so difficult to ascertain whether the criteria for Appendix I are met.
• The species does require more effective conservation and
management.
• As the international pet trade is primarily supplied from
captive stocks, the conservation of this species requires
action in respect of habitat loss and greater enforcement of
domestic laws on taking specimens illegally from the wild.


PROPOSAL
RECOMMENDATION
29. SPOTTED TURTLE
Proponent: USA
REJECT UNLESS SUPPORTED BY CANADA
(Clemmys guttata)
• US populations traded for the pet market, no trade permitted in Canadian populations. 30. BLANDING’S TURTLE
Proponent: USA
REJECT UNLESS SUPPORTED BY CANADA
(Emydoidea blandingii)

• Supporting statement does not make the case for an
Appendix II listing, and is contradictory in places.
• The species is protected at State and Provincial level
throughout its range.

PROPOSAL
RECOMMENDATION
31. DIAMONDBACK
Proponent: USA
TERRAPIN (Malaclemys
terrapin)
• Supporting statement does not make the case for an
Appendix II listing.
• The species is protected at State level throughout its range.

32. FRESHWATER BOX
Proponent: China and USA
REJECT APPENDIX II LISTING, ADOPT ZERO
TURTLES (Batagur
borneoensis, B. trivittata,
• Include Cyclemys spp., Geoemyda japonica, Cuora aurocapitata,
G. spengleri, Hardella thurjii, Mauremys • Do not support unless discussion in Committee I provides C. flavomarginata,
japonica, M. nigricans, Melanochelys trijuga, clearer information justifying the proposal. C. galbinifrons, C. mccordi,
C. mouhotii, C. pani,
bealei, S. quadriocellata and Vijayachelys • Specific proposals are required for the various species C. trifasciata, C. yunnanensis,
mentioned – for example, C. aurocapitata, C. mccordi and C. zhoui, Cyclemys spp.,
C.zhoui (proposed for a zero quota) are clearly candidates for Geoemyda japonica,
• adopt a zero quota on wild specimens for an Appendix I listing. It is not possible at this late stage to G. spengleri, Hardella thurjii,
Heosemys annandalii,
borneoensis, B. trivittata, Cuora H. depressa, Mauremys
annamensis, M. japonica,
C. galbinifrons, C. mccordi, C. mouhotii, M. nigricans, Melanochelys
C. pani, C. trifasciata, C. yunnanensis, PROPOSAL
RECOMMENDATION
trijuga, Morenia petersi, Orlitia C. zhoui, Heosemys annandalii, H. depressa,
borneensis, Sacalia bealei,
Mauremys annamensis, and Orlitia S. quadriocellata and
Vijayachelys silvatica)

33. INDOCHINESE BOX
Proponent: Vietnam
TURTLE (Cuora galbinifrons)
Transfer from Appendix II to Appendix I. • The decline criterion for inclusion in Appendix I is not met as the species remains abundant in some parts of its range. • The present Appendix II listing requires greater enforcement. 34. RYUKYU BLACK-
Proponent: Japan
BREASTED LEAF TURTLE
(Geoemyda japonica)
Include in Appendix II with a zero annual • Criteria for inclusion in Appendix II satisfied. 35. ANNAM LEAF TURTLE
Proponent: Viet Nam
(Mauremys annamensis)
Transfer from Appendix II to Appendix I. • Criteria for inclusion in Appendix I satisfied. PROPOSAL
RECOMMENDATION
• More attention must be given to enforcement or the Appendix I listing will not improve matters. 36. BIG-HEADED TURTLE
Proponent: USA and Viet Nam
(Platysternidae spp)
Transfer from Appendix II to Appendix I. • Data supplied does not satisfy the Appendix I criterion regarding decline. • Domestic factors such as local collection for food are important but outside the scope of CITES. • More attention should be paid to enforcement of existing Appendix II listing. • Range States China and Thailand do not support the proposal. 37. BURMESE STAR
Proponent: USA
TORTOISE (Geochelone
platynota)
Transfer from Appendix II to Appendix I. • Satisfies the criteria for an Appendix I listing, but species PROPOSAL
RECOMMENDATION
• More attention must be given to enforcement or the Appendix I listing will not improve matters. 38. SOFTSHELL TURTLES
Proponent: USA and China
PART SUPPORT PART REJECT
(Aspideretes leithii, Chitra
chitra, C. vandijki, Dogania
• Include Aspideretes leithii, Dogania • Do not support unless discussion in Committee I provides subplana, Nilssonia formosa,
subplana, Nilssonia formosa, Palea clearer information justifying the proposal. Palea steindachneri, Pelodiscus steindachneri, Pelodiscus axenaria,
axenaria, P. maackii,
P. maackii, P. parviformis, and Rafetus • There is a case for an Appendix I listing of Rafetus P. parviformis, and Rafetus
swinhoei, which has not been addressed by the proposal and swinhoei)
• Transfer Chitra chitra and C. vandijki from • Support transfers of Chitra cnitra and C. vankijki to 39. MACHALILLA POISON
Proponent: Equador
DART FROG (Epipedobates
machalilla)
• AC recommendation to correct an anomaly.
• Was not formally recognised as a species when
Epipedobates spp. were included in Appendix II.
PROPOSAL
RECOMMENDATION
40. SOUTHERN GASTRIC-
Proponent: Australia
BROODING FROG
(Rheobatrachus silus)
• Recommended by AC under the Periodic Review of the Appendices. • Species thought to be extinct. 41. NORTHERN GASTRIC-
Proponent: Australia
BROODING FROG
(Rheobatrachus vitellinus)
• Recommended by AC under the Periodic Review of the Appendices. • Species thought to be extinct. 42. OCEANIC WHITETIP
Proponent: Brazil, Colombia and the USA
SHARK (Carcharhinus
longimanus)
Include in Appendix II with the following • Instead, promote effective oversight by Regional Fisheries Management Organisations (RFMOs) and research-based fisheries management at a national level. The entry into effect of the inclusion of • Implementation difficulties make the proposal impractical Appendix II will be delayed by 18 months to e.g. certificates to accompany all fish or fins, responsibility PROPOSAL
RECOMMENDATION
enable Parties to resolve the related technical of the Master of the ship with regard to non-detriment findings; difficulty in identifying shark fins once the skin is removed. • It is doubtful that inclusion would stimulate further research into developing sustainable fisheries. 43. SCALLOPED
Proponent: Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica,
HAMMERHEAD SHARK
Denmark, Ecuador, Honduras and Mexico
(Sphrna lewini); GREAT
• Instead, promote effective oversight by Regional Fisheries HAMMERHEAD SHARK (S.
Include in Appendix II with the following Management Organisations (RFMOs) and research-based mokarran); SMOOTH
fisheries management at a national level. HAMMERHEAD SHARK (S.
zygaena)
The entry into effect of the inclusion of these • Implementation difficulties make the proposal impractical. species in CITES Appendix II will be delayed by 18 months to enable Parties to resolve the • It is doubtful that inclusion would stimulate further related technical and administrative issues. research into developing sustainable fisheries. 44. PORBEAGLE SHARK
Proponent: Brazil, Comoros, Croatia,
(Lamna nasus)
Denmark and Egypt
Include in Appendix II with the following • Instead, promote effective oversight by Regional Fisheries PROPOSAL
RECOMMENDATION
Management Organisations (RFMOs) and research-based fisheries management at a national level. The entry into effect of the inclusion of Lamna nasus in CITES Appendix II will be • Implementation difficulties make the proposal impractical. delayed by 18 months to enable Parties to • It is doubtful that inclusion would stimulate further research into developing sustainable fisheries. 45. FRESHWATER
Proponent: Australia
SAWFISH (Pristis microdon)
Transfer from Appendix II to Appendix I. • Aligns P. microdon with all other Pristidae species. 46. MANTA RAYS (Manta
Proponent: Brazil, Colombia and Ecuador
REJECT UNLESS FAO APPROVES
• Supporting statement insufficiently scientific – sources include “personal communications” which are not verifiable. • The small population sizes inferred are incompatible with the landings data or market surveys. • The advice of the FAO Expert Consultations (not available at the time of this Guide) should be taken into account. PROPOSAL
RECOMMENDATION
47. CEJA RIVER STINGRAY Proponent: Colombia
(Paratrygon aiereba)
Include in Appendix II with the following • Unclear that criteria for Appendix II are met. Include in Appendix III instead.
The entry into effect of the inclusion of Paratrygon aiereba in CITES Appendix II will be delayed by 18 months to enable Parties to resolve the related technical and administrative issues. 48. OSCELLATE RIVER
Proponent: Colombia and Ecuador
STINGRAY (Potamotrygon
motoro); ROSETTE RIVER
Include in Appendix II with the following • Unclear that the criteria for an Appendix II are met. STINGRAY (P. schroedei)
Additional legal protection is required in most of the 12
The entry into effect of the inclusion of range States and attention to enforcement is required. Poramotrygon motoro and Potamotrygon schroedei in CITES Appendix II will be Include in Appendix III instead.
delayed by 18 months to enable Parties to PROPOSAL
RECOMMENDATION
49. CORSICAN
Proponent: Denmark
SWALLOWTAIL
BUTTERFLY (Papilio
Transfer from Appendix I to Appendix II. • Evaluated by the AC under Periodic Review of the hospiton)
Appendices. • No longer meets the criteria for Appendix I. 50. QUERETARO YUCCA
Proponent: Mexico
(Yucca queretaroensis)
• Does not satisfy the criteria for Appendix II.
• Instead, list in Appendix III.
51. JABIHY (Operculicarya
Proponent: Madagascar
decaryi)
• Does not satisfy the criteria for Appendix II. • No exports in the past six years. PROPOSAL
RECOMMENDATION
52. HOODIA (Hoodia spp.)
Proponent: Botswana, Namibia and South
Amend annotation #9 related to Hoodia spp. The amended annotation reflects the original intention of
to refer to all parts and derivatives except the proponents when Hoodia spp. were listed at CoP13. those bearing a label indicating they were produced from Hoodia spp. material obtained Some importing States have incorrectly assumed that an
through controlled harvesting and production agreement between the governments of Botswana, Namibia and South Africa was required, rather than with the relevant CITES Management Authority of Management Authority of the relevant country. 53. GINSENG (Panax ginseng
Proponent: USA
and Panax quinquefolius)
Amendment of the annotation to the listings The language to be added was excluded in 2007. However,
of Panax ginseng and Panax this caused confusion as to whether manufactured goods quinquefolius included in Appendix II: were included in the annotation and so subject to an Appendix II listing. The amendment will clarify that manufactured goods are not included in the listing and avoid “Designates whole and sliced roots and parts of roots, excluding manufactured parts or derivatives such as powders, pills, extracts, tonics, teas and confectionery.” PROPOSAL
RECOMMENDATION
54. KAUTSKY’S
Proponent: Brazil
QUALIFIED SUPPORT
TILLANDSIA (Tillandsia
kautskyi)
Endorsed by the PC.

Supporting information is insufficient to reach a
conclusion.
Further supporting information will be required from the
proponent when presenting the proposal to the CoP.
55. SPRENGEI’S
Proponent: Brazil
QUALIFIED SUPPORT
TILLANDSIA (Tillandsia
sprengeliana)
Endorsed by the PC.
Supporting information is insufficient to reach a
conclusion.
Further supporting information will be required from the
proponent when presenting the proposal to the CoP.
56. SUGAR TILLANDSIA
Proponent: Brazil
QUALIFIED SUPPORT
(Tillandisa sucrei)
Endorsed by the PC.
PROPOSAL
RECOMMENDATION
Supporting information is insufficient to reach a
conclusion.
Further supporting information will be required from the
proponent when presenting the proposal to the CoP.
57. LAGUNA BEACH LIVE-
Proponent: USA
FOREVER (Dudleya
stolonifera) and SANTA
• Does not qualify for Appendix II as there is no international BARBARA ISLAND LIVE-
FOREVER (Dudleya traskiae)
58. MALAGASY EBONY
Proponent: Madagascar
REJECT OR AMEND
(Diospyros spp.)
Include the populations of Madagascar in • The proposal contains insufficient data on the specific Appendix II, and limited to logs, sawn wood • Amend to apply only to those species that are known to be adversely affected by unregulated logging activity rather than all Diospyros spp. in Madagascar. PROPOSAL
RECOMMENDATION
59. BRAZILIAN
Proponent: Brazil
QUALIFIED SUPPORT
ROSEWOOD (Aniba
rosaeodora)
Amend annotation #12:
• This amendment follows an examination of defined terms trade), extracts” by deletion of references to • “extract” will be defined as “Any substance • It is not clear whether the definition of “extract” will be a or product obtained directly from plant footnote to the annotation or merely an administrative regardless of the manufacturing process. An extract may be solid (crystals, resin, fine or • The proponent should clarify how this amendment is coarse particles), semi-sold (gums, waxes), or liquid (solutions, tinctures, oil and essential 60. THAILAND
Proponent: Thailand and Viet Nam
ROSEWOOD (Dalbergia
cochinchinensis)
Inclusion in Appendix II with the following Satisfies the criteria for Appendix II.
annotation: #5 Logs, sawn wood, veneer sheets. PROPOSAL
RECOMMENDATION
61. BLACK ROSEWOOD
Proponent: Belize
(Dalbergia retusa) and
GRANADILLO
Satisfies the criteria for Appendix II.
ROSEWOOD (Dalbergia
granadillo)
• Dalbergia granadillo is included on account of “look-alike” 62. HONDURAS
Proponent: Belize
ROSEWOOD (Dalbergia
stevensonii)
• Satisfies the criteria for Appendix II. 63. MALAGASY
Proponent: Madagascar
ROSEWOOD (Dalbergia spp.)
Include the populations of Madagascar in • Satisfies the criteria for Appendix II. Appendix II, and limited to logs, sawn wood 64. TARABY (Senna
Proponent: Madagascar
meridionalis)
• Does not satisfy the criteria for Appendix II. PROPOSAL
RECOMMENDATION
65. BOTTLE LIANA (Adenia
Proponent: Madagascar
firingalavensis)
• Does not satisfy the criteria for Appendix II. 66. KATAKATA (Adenia
Proponent: Madagascar
subsessifolia)
• Does not satisfy the criteria for Appendix II. 67. UNCARINA (Uncarina
Proponent: Madagascar
grandidieri)
• Does not satisfy the criteria for Appendix II. 68. UNCARINA (Uncarina
Proponent: Madagascar
stellulifera)
• Does not satisfy the criteria for Appendix II. PROPOSAL
RECOMMENDATION
• No exports in the past six years.

69. EAST AFRICAN
Proponent: Kenya
SANDALWOOD (Osyris
lanceolata)
• Little evidence presented to support inclusion in Appendix II. • Not clear whether range States have been consulted or support this proposal. 70. AGARWOOD (Aquilaria
Proponent: China, Indonesia and Kuwait
spp. and Gyrinops spp.
Deletion of the annotation to the listing of • Should be considered in conjunction with CoP16 Doc. 67. Aquilaria spp. and Gyrinops spp. in • This proposal and CoP16 Doc. 67 are in response to annotation with a new number, as follows: decisions adopted at CoP15, and are the result of two • Specimens without any conservation risk, such as mixed oil, exhausted powder and some finished products packaged b) seedling or tissue cultures obtained in and ready for retail trade would be exempt from CITES vitro, in solid or liquid media, transported in PROPOSAL
RECOMMENDATION
• Considerably more work will be required to implement the • Although because of conservation concerns the exemption will not apply to beads, prayer beads and carvings, it is e) mixed oil containing less than 15 % of proposed to amend Res. Conf. 13.7 (Rev. CoP14) on Control of trade in personal and household effects to exempt certain "Mixed oil containing xx% of agarwood obtained through controlled harvesting and production in collaboration with the CITES Management Authorities of XX (name of the State)"; samples of the labels and list of relevant exporters should be communicated to the Secretariat by States and then all Parties through a Notification; f) exhausted agarwood powder, including compressed powder in all shapes; g) finished products packaged and ready for retail trade, this exemption does not apply to beads, prayer beads and carvings. PROPOSAL
RECOMMENDATION
71. LAZA (Cyphostemma laza) Proponent: Madagascar
• Insufficient information provided to support inclusion in Appendix II. • Further research has been undertaken under an agreement between the Secretariat and the EU, which will assist in evaluating the case for inclusion in Appendix II. WORKING DOCUMENTS VOTING RECOMMENDATIONS - SUMMARY
KEY: SUPPORT; REJECT;  PART SUPPORT PART REJECT; [ ] QUALIFIED; WG REFER TO WG
DOCUMENT VOTE DOCUMENT VOTE
DOCUMENT
WORKING DOCUMENTS
COP16 DOCUMENT
RECOMMENDATION
ADMINISTRATIVE
1. Election of the
Chair and Vice-Chair
of the meeting and
Chairs of Committees
I and II and the
Credentials
Committee

2. Adoption of the
• The provisional agenda for the meeting is proposed NO COMMENT
3. Adoption of the
• The Working Programme divides the work between NO COMMENT
Working Programme
two Committees, Committee I deals with species listing proposals, and Committee II deals with matters relating to the Convention. 4. Rules of Procedure
Rules of Procedure must be adopted for each CoP PART SUPPORT PART REJECT
COP16 DOCUMENT
RECOMMENDATION
4.1 Report of the
The Secretariat proposes the following changes to the • Reject the reduction of the deadline for the submission of Secretariat
working documents to ensure proper preparation (including • refer to “draft resolutions, draft decisions, and other documents” rather than just “draft resolutions and • reduce the working documents submission deadline for meetings of the CoP from 150 days to 120 days; • provide clearer guidance to the chair on the handing • to allow Parties to verify their electronic vote. 4.2 Proposal to
Proponent: Denmark
improve transparency
of voting during
• proposals for a secret ballot to require a simple • the proposal would make it more difficult to obtain a secret meetings of the CoP
majority vote (instead of 10 representatives seconding ballot • the secret ballot allows Parties to vote in accordance with the • proposals for a secret ballot shall not themselves be advice of their scientific advisers on emotive issues without concern of reprisals towards individual representatives or their COP16 DOCUMENT
RECOMMENDATION

4.3 Proposed

Proponent: Mexico
amendment to Rule
25 on Methods of
• The proposal would make it more difficult to obtain a secret voting – Use of secret
ballot (requiring at least 59 parties to move to secret ballot). • proposal for a secret ballot to be seconded by one third of the representatives of the Parties eligible to • The secret ballot allows Parties to vote in accordance with the vote (instead of 10 representatives seconding the advice of their scientific advisers on emotive issues without fear of reprisals towards individual representatives or their • where the ballot relates to the election of officers or
prospective host countries, only 10 representatives are
required to second the proposal;

• proposals for a secret ballot shall not themselves be
decided by a secret ballot.

5. Credentials
NO COMMENT
Committee
5.1 Establishment of
the Credentials
Committee
5.2 Report of the

COP16 DOCUMENT
RECOMMENDATION

Credentials
Committee

6. Admission of
SUPPORT admission of all qualified observers.
observers

7. Report of UNEP
• The report summarises areas of collaboration NOTE REPORT
(United Nations
between UNEP and the Secretariat regarding CITES. Environment
Programme)

8. Financing and
SUPPORT adequate Secretariat budget
budgeting of the
Secretariat and of
• However, proposals for additional programs and staff must be meetings of the CoP
evaluated critically given funding constraints. 8.1 Implementation of
REJECT issue-related lobbying
the Costed
programme of work
• Some observer groups suggest the denial of funding to for 2010-11
activities with which they disagree. Such discussions should take place under the proper agenda item, not in the budget. 8.2 Implementation of
the costed programme
COP16 DOCUMENT
RECOMMENDATION

of work for 2011

8.3 Budgetary
proposals for 2014 to
8.4 Access to the
• CoP15 directed the Secretariat to explore obtaining Global Environment
funds to assist Parties manage wildlife and regulate Facility (GEF)
• It recommends that the Parties designate the GEF (a financial mechanism for several other conventions) as a financial mechanism for CITES and approve a draft 8.5 Access to other
• CoP15 directed the Secretariat to investigate and sources of funding
report on ways to secure funding to support the provision of technical assistance to Parties in relation • The Secretariat asks for the Parties to provide financial and technical assistance and the secondment of officers, and to require the Secretariat to organise a Wildlife Donor Roundtable of relevant agencies and financial institutions COP16 DOCUMENT
RECOMMENDATION
9. Arrangements for
Proponent: Central African Republic, Mali and
Meetings
• Proposed guidelines on the submitting, distribution • A number of the suggested new rules would be unduly and translation of documents for special meetings onerous for the Secretariat and would not facilitate the work of organised by the Secretariat between CoPs. the Parties and the Secretariat e.g. to hold an additional preliminary meeting to approve the delegates to be invited to the relevant meeting. STRATEGIC
10. Committee
• Reports summarising activities of the committees NOTE REPORTS
Reports and
since CoP15 and anticipated activities following Recommendations of
the SC, AC and PC,
and election of new
regional and alternate
regional members
COP16 DOCUMENT
RECOMMENDATION
11. Potential conflicts
• Proposed amendments to Res. Conf. 11.1 (Rev. PART SUPPORT PART REJECT
of interest in the
CoP15) on Establishment of Committees regarding Animals and Plants
the election of members, conduct of committee work • Transparency in relation to potential conflicts of interest is to Committees
and potential conflicts of interest from external be encouraged. However, measures should not be adopted which discourage the participation of persons with significant and valuable expertise gained in a commercial context. 12. CITES Strategic
• The Parties are requested to adopt the revisions to SUPPORT
the Strategic vision shown in the Annex and extend the validity of the revised Strategic Vision to 2020. 13. Co-operation with
• The Secretariat describes co-operation between organisations and
other organisations and MEAs, a goal of the Strategic multilateral
Vision 2008-13. It recommends a review of all environmental
resolutions and decisions with a view to rationalising agreements (MEAs)
and consolidating activities related to co-operation. COP16 DOCUMENT
RECOMMENDATION
14. Draft resolution
Proponent: Switzerland
and decision on the
co-operation of
• A proposed new resolution directing the SC to • This proposal duplicates Document 13 and should be CITES with other
explore further opportunities to strengthen co- withdrawn. An additional resolution is unhelpful given the biodiversity-related
operation, co-ordination and synergies among the Secretariat has recommended rationalising resolutions and conventions
15. International
• The Secretariat reports on the creation of the NOTE REPORT
Consortium on
ICCWC with INTERPOL, the United Nations Office Combating Wildlife
on Drugs and Crime, the World Bank, and the World • The ICCWC has the potential to make a significant impact on Crime (ICCWC)
16. Resolution on Co-
Proponent: PC (collaborating with the Mexican
operation with the
Scientific Authority)
Global Strategy for
• The draft resolution would benefit from clarification of how Plant Conservation
• CoP15 directed the PC and the Secretariat to the responsibilities of the Secretariat would be carried out e.g. (GSPC) of the
collaborate with the GSCP of the CBD to develop in relation to encouraging information exchanges and the cost Convention on
strategy beyond 2010. The draft resolution notes Biological Diversity
progress to date and sets out the next steps. COP16 DOCUMENT
RECOMMENDATION
17. Intergovernmental Proponent: SC (in consultation with the
QUALIFIED SUPPORT
Science-Policy
Secretariat)
Platform on
• The draft decisions represent a realistic approach to Biodiversity and
• CoP15 directed that the Secretariat participate in progressing and defining a working relationship between Ecosystem Services
and report to CoP16 on discussions regarding IPBES and to report on progress regarding its establishment. • The draft decision could be improved by clarification of what • A proposed decision sets out next steps, including is required of the Parties in relation to reinforcing linkages reinforcing linkages between CITES and IPBES and between CITES and IPBES and the costs of doing so. the establishment of a WG to prepare a draft resolution for CoP17 on the relationship between • Measures to ensure that a scientific approach to decision- making prevails are to be welcomed. However, it may be appropriate for the Parties to consider whether this is a priority compared with other areas requiring funding e.g. capacity-building. 18. Co-operation
• CoP14 authorised the investigation of whether between Parties and
stricter domestic measures were effective in achieving the promotion of
the objectives of CITES, including a review of the • SC recommends that the WG continues until CoP17. multilateral measures
extent to which resolutions are implemented consistently and determination of the scope for • Reauthorise the relevant CoP14 decisions, which were multilateral CITES processes that reduce the need for revalidated at CoP15 (Decision 14.28 (Rev. CoP15) to COP16 DOCUMENT
RECOMMENDATION
• There has been some delay but funds are now available for a consultant and terms of reference have been drawn up. 19. CITES and
• CoP15 required the SC WG on livelihoods to REFER TO WG
livelihoods
present CoP16 with a draft resolution and recommendations on livelihoods, to finalise the • The SC WG recommendation that the resolution is linked to toolkit for assessing the implementation of CITES the toolkit and guidelines may present difficulties for some decisions on the livelihoods of the poor, and to Parties, and should be referred to a WG at CoP16 for further finalise voluntary guidelines for addressing negative 20. Wildlife trade
• Report from the Secretariat on progress on policy reviews
implementing Res. Conf. 15.2 on Wildlife Trade Policy Reviews. No additional policy reviews have • The proposed activity is subject to funding, and the Parties been undertaken by the Parties since CoP15 although should consider carefully whether the suggested activities • Draft resolutions direct the Parties voluntarily to undertake wildlife trade policy reviews, and direct the Secretariat to undertake various activities to stimulate greater interest among the Parties. COP16 DOCUMENT
RECOMMENDATION
21. Capacity building
• Draft decisions encourage Parties to make greater use of the CITES Virtual College, participate in reviewing its contents, and translate its materials into • Strengthening national capacities with regard to non- detriment findings, enforcement and compliance have been identified repeatedly by the Parties as priorities.


22. Proposal
Proponents: Ghana, Senegal and Sierra Leone
concerning a needs
assessment for
• Two draft decisions and a questionnaire are • It is essential to focus on the specific needs of Parties rather strengthening the
proposed for an assessment of specific technological, than assume that one method of capacity-building e.g. implementation of
logistical and equipment requirements that would CITES in developing
assist developing counties to implement CITES countries

23. Capacity-building
• CoP15 required the AC and PC to review the non- programme for
detriment finding (NDF) training materials used in science-based
regional capacity-building workshops and advise on • It may be appropriate for the proponents to clarify why they establishment and
consider Decisions 15.24 and 12.91 should be repealed. implementation of
voluntary national
• A draft decision and changes to Res. Conf. 11.1 export quotas for
(Rev. CoP15) and consequential repeals of decisions COP16 DOCUMENT
RECOMMENDATION

Appendix II species –

Report of the AC and
a) direct the Secretariat to invite Parties to workshops and materials on the making of b) for the AC to provide advice on training 24. World Wildlife
Proponent: Thailand
QUALIFIED SUPPORT
• A proposal to declare 3 March each year to be • Support provided that the proposal does not require CITES to World Wildlife Day (the CITES Convention was incur expenditure as a consequence of the declaration. INTERPRETATION
IMPLEMENTATION
CONVENTION
REVIEW OF
RESOLUTIONS
COP16 DOCUMENT
RECOMMENDATION

25. Proposals of the

Secretariat
Res. Conf. 4.6 (Rev. CoP15) on Submission of draft
resolutions and other documents for meetings of the
Conference of the Parties (See Doc. 4.1)
• include a reference to “draft decisions” ; • reduce the deadline for submission of working • adopt an official text of the convention in Arabic. Res. Conf. 9.5 (Rev. CoP15) on Trade with States
not party to the Convention
• Clarification of information to be included in re- export permits and certificates where the exporting • Documentation where a non-Party is unable to COP16 DOCUMENT
RECOMMENDATION
Res. Conf. 9.6 (Rev) on Trade in readily
recognisable parts and derivatives
• Urine, feces and white ambergris to be excluded Res. Conf. 9.24 (Rev. CoP15) on Criteria for
amendments of Appendices I and II
• Correction of minor typographical error from Res. Conf. 11.1 (Rev. CoP15) on Establishment of
Committees
• Authorise the practice of the SC, PC and AC of • Make the resolution consistent with the later Res. • Editorial corrections to the Spanish and French COP16 DOCUMENT
RECOMMENDATION
Res. Conf. 11.17 (Rev.CoP14) on National Reports
• Correct omission of deadline for submission of Res. Conf. 11.18 on Trade in Appendix II and III
species
• Incorporate the provisions of Res. Conf. 11.18 into Res. Conf. 12.3 (Rev. CoP15) on Permits and
Certificates
• Provide for one certificate only for an item • Provide a definition of “State of usual residence” which is used in the definition of “hunting trophy”. It is proposed to amend the resolution as follows: “the • Given the need to identify the meaning of “State of usual term may be subject to varying interpretation in residence” in the national law of the importing country, the accordance with national law but, as a practical guide, suggested guidance is of no assistance. should be understood to mean the State where the person concerned has established a home and has spent the majority of his or her time for at least 6 COP16 DOCUMENT
RECOMMENDATION
Res. Conf. 12.10 (Rev.CoP15) on Registration of
operations that breed Appendix I animal species for
commercial purposes
• Delete duplication of Annexes to the Resolution; Annex 3 of the Resolution to replace Annex 1. - Annex 10
Res. Conf. 13.6 (Rev. CoP15) on Implementation of
Article VII, para 2 concerning “pre-Convention”
specimens
• Clarify that an item manufactured from a mix of pre- and post-convention skins is not pre-convention. - Annex 11
Res. Conf. 13.8 on Participation of observers at
meetings of the CoPs
• Clarify that “observers” are representatives of approved entities, not the entities themselves. COP16 DOCUMENT
RECOMMENDATION
26. Trade in elephant
CoP15 directed the Secretariat to evaluate the need to REFER TO WG
specimens
revise Res. Conf. 10.10 (Rev. CoP15) on Trade in Elephant Specimens and report at CoP16. This Res. • The revised draft resolution is a very useful framework for Conf. includes provisions relating to ivory trade discussion but agreement is likely to require further controls and the management of ivory stockpiles. • Reject the proposed provision that trade in Appendix II raw ivory for commercial purposes should be authorised only as agreed by the CoP. This is contrary to the right of the Parties to propose amendments to the Appendices at any time and would entrench current annotations of the convention which may or may not be appropriate going forward. • The Secretariat did not recommend any changes to elephant hunting quotas, and any attempt to include restrictions as part of this exercise, in a WG or from the floor, should be resisted. 27. Climate Change
CoP15 required the identification of the scientific NOTE REPORT
aspects of the convention that are actually or likely to be affected by climate change, and report to CoP16. • Suggestions from the floor to convert the findings into decisions and guidelines at this point would be controversial and premature and should be rejected. COP16 DOCUMENT
RECOMMENDATION
COMPLIANCE AND
ENFORCEMENT
28. National laws for
CoP15 directed Parties to provide information on NOTE REPORT
implementation of the what measures had been taken to implement the
Convention
29. Enforcement
The Secretariat reports on its work in relation to NOTE REPORT
enforcement, and developments in combatting wildlife crime since CoP15 and recommends updating
Res. Conf. 11.3 (Rev. CoP15) on Compliance and
30. National Reports
The Secretariat reports on the Parties’ compliance NOTE REPORT
with reporting requirements and its work in facilitating and improving compliance since CoP15. 31. Disposal of
Proponent: Indonesia
illegally-traded and
confiscated specimens It is proposed that the SC undertakes a review of
• Of particular concern is the implication in Res. Conf. 9.10 of Appendix II and
existing resolutions relating to the disposal of illegally that the confiscating State has the right to sell the specimens for III species
traded and confiscated specimens of Appendix I, II its own benefit, rather than for the benefit of the State of origin. COP16 DOCUMENT
RECOMMENDATION
TRADE CONTROL
AND MARKING
32. Introduction from
• CoP14 authorised the SC to consider various areas REFER TO WG
of difficulty relating to introduction from the sea, including the terms “transportation into a State” and Further consideration is needed regarding which is the State
“State of introduction” and the process for issuing a of export where charter vessels are used. The proposal is for certification of introduction from the sea. the State in which the vessel is registered, but consideration should also be given to the State connected with the harvesting activity. • The usefulness of a new source code for specimens taken from non-jurisdictional waters is unclear as the existing “W” denoting “wild” seems appropriate. Res. Conf. 12.3 on Permits and Certificates is already complex and unnecessary further amendments should be avoided. 33. Non-detriment
• CoP15 directed the AC and PC to prepare draft REFER TO WG
findings (NDFs)
guidance on the making on NDFs. A resolution on non-binding guidelines for NDFs is proposed. The proposed resolution is premature as the AC and PC were
COP16 DOCUMENT
RECOMMENDATION
authorised only to produce a discussion document. In the absence of a discussion document, it is difficult for the Parties to judge the merit of the resolution. • Even though the proposed draft resolution is clearly referenced as a voluntary guideline, Parties may set regulations to comply with the CITES resolution that restrict exporting Parties’ procedures and processes on how to make a NDF. • There is concern that such a resolution may be used to impose unilateral trade bans without the procedures laid down by the Convention. • A better approach would be to improve the technical competence of Parties to make NDFs. 34. Electronic
• CoP15 directed the updating of the CITES permitting
electronic toolkit with electronic permitting standards and norms. This has been completed, but the • E-permitting is to be welcomed and will assist enforcement of Secretariat requests an extension of the mandate to and compliance with the Convention by making permits easier to authenticate and possibly harder to forge. • Given the technology is constantly evolving, an extension of the mandate is appropriate. COP16 DOCUMENT
RECOMMENDATION
35. Improving the
Proponent: China
efficiency of
international co-
• The management authority of an importing State • This is a serious issue which if not addressed may operation on permit
may need to consult the management authority of the compromise effective implementation of the convention. and certificate
exporting or re-exporting State to verify the verification
authenticity of documents accompanying a shipment. A resolution is proposed for the Secretariat and the Parties to adopt a range of co-operative measures. 36. Decision-making
• CoP14 directed the SC to propose for approval at mechanism for a
CoP16 a decision-making mechanism for CoPs for a process of trade in
process of trade in ivory. The Secretariat requests • A mechanism for resolving differences of opinion between revalidation of Decision 14.77 until CoP17 with a the Parties on this issue is much needed. WG consisting of two parties from each of central, eastern, southern and western Africa, two parties from Asia, China, Japan, the UK and the USA. 37. Decision-making
Proponents: Benin, Burkina Faso, Central African REJECT
mechanism for a
Republic, Côte d’Ivoire, Kenya, Liberia and
process of trade in
• A proposal to amend Decision 14.77 to clarify what • The focus in relation to Decision 14.77 should be to develop a is meant by “decision-making mechanism”. workable and efficient process for decision-making, leaving all COP16 DOCUMENT
RECOMMENDATION
consideration of the merits of trade in ivory for consideration at the relevant CoPs in accordance with that process. 38. Purpose Codes on
• CoP14 required the SC to examine the use of CITES permits and
purpose codes by the Parties. A new suite of purpose certificates
codes with definitions is proposed, eliminating some • The SC WG has produced a welcomed reduction in the number of codes and clarified the remaining codes with clear definitons.

39. Transport of live
• CoP15 direct the AC and PC to replace the 1981 specimens
CITES Guidelines for transport and preparation for shipment of wild animals and plant with new • It would however be best not to involve the SC given the guidelines for non-air transport and recommend nature of this issue and the SC’s existing workload. All amendments to Res. Conf. 10.21 on Transport of Live references to the SC in the amended resolution should therefore Specimens and Res. Conf. 12.3 (Rev. CoP15) on Permits and Certificates. Amendments are suggested for Res. Conf. 10.21 but not Res. Conf. 40. Cross-border
Proponent: USA
movement of musical
instruments
• A proposal to allow the frequent cross-border SUPPORT WITH MODIFICATIONS
movement of musical instruments that contain COP16 DOCUMENT
RECOMMENDATION
CITES-listed species through a passport-like CITES should address unforeseen beaureaucratic obstacles to
document similar to that used for CITES-listed pets. legitimate cross-border movements involving CITES-listed specimens. • However, the proposed amendment to Res. Conf. 12.3 refers only to orchestras and should allow other ensembles or individual musicians to benefit. 41. Use of taxonomic
• CoP15 directed the SC to investigate the potential serial numbers (TSN)
utility of TSNs in the CITES context. An extension of the mandate is sought to consider further technical • The SC WG concluded that it is not currently useful or feasible to use TSNs, so it is unclear what benefit there is in continuing to consider this given constraints on resources. 42. Physical
• CoP14 directed the Secretariat to consider physical inspection of timber
inspections of timber shipments. However, no Party shipments
offered to chair the WG and work has not progressed. A draft decision is proposed to capture information obtained during this initiative which is to be discontinued due to lack of participation. COP16 DOCUMENT
RECOMMENDATION
43. Standard
Nomenclature
43. 1 Report of the
Report on activities since CoP15
NOTE REPORT AND SUPPORT
Animals and Plants
Committee
• Recommends amendment of Res. Conf. 12.11 (Rev. CoP15) on Standard Nomenclature to allow for ongoing role in respect of Appendix III species that • Recommends adoption of the UNEP-WCMC list of coral species for CITES purposes, and revision of that 43.2 Standard
nomenclature for
Hippocampus species
Proponent: Switzerland
• Correction of an omission of five new Hippocampus SUPPORT
spp. from the Annex of Res. Conf. 12.11 (Rev.
CoP15).
COP16 DOCUMENT
RECOMMENDATION
44. Identification
44.1 Secretariat
• The Secretariat reports on issues relating to the Identification Manual, and requests amendments to Res. Conf. 11.19 on Identification Manual to reflect Reducing the reporting requirements of the Secretariat is
its current electronic format and to reduce its reporting burden to each technical committee from “each meeting” to “whenever appropriate”. • The PC WG on Bigleaf Mahogany and other Neotropical Timber Species presents two draft decisions to improve the identification and guidance material and to increase their availability to the Parties. 45. E-commerce of
• CoP15 directed the Secretariat to analyse data NOTE REPORT
specimens of CITES-
provided by the Parties to determine whether the listed species
increased use of the internet as a trade mechanism • Any further work on e-commerce should be done by the resulted in changes in trade routes and methods of Secretariat rather than the SC given the SC’s workload. transport. The Secretariat reports on its activities and repeats its request for data from Parties. COP16 DOCUMENT
RECOMMENDATION
EXEMPTIONS AND
SPECIAL TRADE
PROVISIONS
46. Personal and
• CoP15 extended the mandate of a WG on Personal household effects
and Household Effects to clarify various aspects including the relationship between “tourist souvenirs” “hunting trophies” and “personal and household
effects”. SC recommends guidelines in a new annex
to Res. Conf. 13.7 (Rev. CoP14) on Control of trade
in personal and household effects.


47. Control of trade in Proponents: Indonesia and Kuwait
personal and
household effects
Proposal to revise Res. Conf. 13.7 (Rev. CoP14) on Control of trade in personal and household effects to include limited specimens of agarwood in the list of COP16 DOCUMENT
RECOMMENDATION
48. Implementation of Proponents: Denmark (on behalf of the EU) and
the Convention
relating to captive-
• Amendments to existing resolutions and a draft resolution bred and ranched
• The proponents are concerned that specimens may regarding compliance are unnecessary as there are existing specimens
be declared as captive-bred but have not compiled mechanisms to deal with non-compliance and if necessary with the Convention’s conditions regarding capitive deregister a captive breeding operation or return a ranched breeding. It is proposed to engage an expert to consider the concerns and for proposals to be made to
review the ranching provisions of the convention.
• In relation to reptiles, concerns are addressed by Agenda Item 57, Snake Trade and Conservation Management (see below) and should be considered in conjunction with that item. This would render the proposed decisions redundant. SPECIES TRADE
CONSERVATION
49. Great Apes
The Secretariat will report on technical missions undertaken. It proposes updating amendments to Res. Conf. 13.4 and promises a report on the findings • Parties will be supplied with a copy of the report at CoP16 but it is anticipated that it will be appropriate to endorse its COP16 DOCUMENT
RECOMMENDATION
50. Asian big cats
The Secretariat will report activities in relation to Asian big cats since CoP15. It deals with various administrative matters and establishing various structures to facilitate intelligence-sharing and more effective law enforcement in relation to Asian big cats. 51. Illegal trade in
Proponents: Ethiopia, Kenya and Uganda
cheetahs
A proposal for a study of the legal and illegal trade in It may be appropriate to define the terms of reference more
wild cheetahs and its impact on conservation of the clearly, given the logistical difficulties involved in a study of wildlife trafficking, particularly in the locations implicated in
the trade, and resource constraints.



52. Leopard quotas
Proponents: Botswana, South Africa, USA
QUALIFIED SUPPORT
• There have been conflicts between range States and • The proponents have left alternative options open for importing countries regarding what information discussion, so referral to a WG may be helpful. should be included on export permits for leopard skins. The relevant provisions are Res. Conf. 10.14 • The proposal is welcome as an attempt to avoid unnecessary (Rev. CoP14) on Quotas for leopard hunting trophies seizures and delays. COP16 DOCUMENT
RECOMMENDATION
and skins for personal use and Res. Conf. 12.5 (Rev. • The quotas should relate to animals “harvested for export” CoP15) Permits and Certificates as it relates to rather than simply “harvested”, as the domestic harvest, if any, is a matter for the range State and not within the juridiction of • It is proposed to clarify that the quotas given relate to animals harvested (not exported) in a calendar year,
and that the skins may be exported in the year of
• Other measures proposed include clarifying information to be entered on the standard CITES permit form, and the development of a process for replacing tags lost or damaged during taxidermy. 53. Elephants
NOTE REPORTS
53.1 Monitoring the
• A report on trends in the levels of illegal killing of Illegal Killing of
elephants based on data to the end of 2011. It Elephants (MIKE)
indicates an ongoing increase in poaching. An updated trend analysis (to June 2012) is expected to • The illegal annual offtake is likely to be higher than the number of elephants born annually, so that the COP16 DOCUMENT
RECOMMENDATION
elephant population is in net decline. Key factors identified are poverty, poor law enforcement, weak governance, and an increasing demand for illegal 53.2 Monitoring of
illegal trade in ivory
and other elephant
specimens:
53.2.1 Report of the
• A general view of enforcement matters relating to Secretariat
elephants and a number of specific recommendations. From a number of incidents in 2012 it appears armed groups in Central and East Africa are targeting elephants to raise funds for weapons and ammunition to support ongoing conflicts. Actions taken and required in order to implement the Action Plan for Control of Trade in Ivory are discussed, including The Secretariat recommends convening a CITES Ivory Enforcement Task Force consisting of representatives from China, Kenya, Malaysia, Phillipines, South Africa, Thailand, Uganda, Tanzania COP16 DOCUMENT
RECOMMENDATION
and Viet Nam to review existing strategies and if 53.2.2 The Elephant
• A report from TRAFFIC assessing ETIS data to Trade Information
System (ETIS) and
the Illicit Trade in
53.3 African Elephant Proponents: Nigeria and Rwanda
Action Plan (AEAP)
and African Elephant
• The SC is asked to request that UNEP provide the Fund (AEF)
necessary secretarial support to the SC of the AEF to • Given the importance CoPs have and no doubt will continue ensure it is able to meet its obligations concerning the to place on effective implementation of the AEAP, the AEAP. sustainability of the AEF should be incorporated into the mainline fund-raising strategy for implementing the • Financial contributions are requested to support implementation of the AEAP and the Secretariat is directed to integrate fund-raising for this purpose into
its overall fundraising strategy.

COP16 DOCUMENT
RECOMMENDATION
54. Rhinoceroses
54.1 Report of the
• In response to growing concern about increasing rhino poaching and illegal trade in rhino horn, the 2011 meeting of the SC established a WG, assisted by TRAFFIC, with wide-ranging terms of reference to • The WG’s recommendations focus on improving enforcement in all States involved in trafficking rhino 54.2 Report of the
• The report summarises actions taken by the Secretariat
Secretariat since CoP15, including a video documentary and strengthening wildlife forensic • Four new decisions are proposed that continue to focus on enhanced enforcement based on intelligence-sharing with particular emphasis on the relevance of Viet Nam and its nationals. COP16 DOCUMENT
RECOMMENDATION
55. Tibetan antelope
• Poaching of the Tibetan antelope is much reduced compared to the late 1900s and early 2000s, and • The SC and the Secretariat therefore recommend the SUPPORT
removal of a reporting requirement from Res. Conf.
11.8 (Rev. CoP13) on Conservation of and control of 56. Saiga antelope
• None of the range States have submitted the required biennial reports and the Secretariat is therefore unable to report on implementation of the Medium-Term International Work Programme for the
saiga antelope (2007-2011).
• The Secretariat has however summarised a number of activities carried out since CoP15, and has obtained
information on the most important consumer and
trading countries of saiga parts and derivatives and • The Secretariat recommends new decisions requiring reports from range States and consumer Consideration should be given to facilitating reporting e.g.
COP16 DOCUMENT
RECOMMENDATION
rationalising the number of reports required and adapting the biennial format to accommodate special reports such as those required for saiga antelope. 57. Snake trade and
Proponent: Switzerland (on behalf of the SC)
conservation
management
• These recommendations derive from a technical • The decisions, when implemented, will lead to a better workshop authorised by CoP15 to examine Asian The decisions would be improved by reducing or removing
• The draft decisions involve studies on production the involvement of the SC and so streamlining the reporting systems, guidance for monitoring and controlling process. The SC has a heavy workload and many of the items such systems; guidance for making non-detriment earmarked for the SC are scientific and may be better allocated findings for trade in Appendix II snake species; methods to differentiate wild species from captive- bred; traceability; capacity building and training; and collaboration in South East Asia on enforcement 58. Tortoises and
freshwater turtles
58.1 Report of the
The SC proposed a suite of draft decisions relating
Standing Committee
to non-detriment findings for tortoises and freshwater COP16 DOCUMENT
RECOMMENDATION
However, the SC has a heavy workload and many of the items
earmarked for the SC are scientific and may be better allocated • Further draft decisions require the Parties to make reports in relation to species of which all but one Given limited resources, new requirements should not be
placed on Parties, the Secretariat and the SC in relation to species which are not regulated by the convention 58.2 Report of the
The AC reports on activities in this area since CoP15. REJECT
Animals Committee
The report and draft decisions duplicate much of the Given limited resources it is questionable whether the
substantial allocation of resource is justified.
59. Hawksbill turtle
• CoP15 directed the Secretariat to collaborate with various regional conventions and range States of the Caribbean and Western Atlantic report on the 2009 • However, it may be preferable to amend the decision to regional workshop on hawksbill turtles and explore include a mandate for the Secretariat to explore a memorandum of understanding with the IAC Secretariat to identify and strengthen synergies in areas of common concern e.g. illegal A draft decision directs the Secretariat to collaborate trade.
with the Secretariat of the Inter-American Convention
for the Protection and Conservation of Sea Turtles
COP16 DOCUMENT
RECOMMENDATION
(IAC) regarding recommendations that are outstanding from the workshop (most recommendations have been implemented). 60. Sturgeons and
paddlefish
60.1 Report of the
• AC makes recommendations for action based on an Animals Committee
evaluation process originating in CoP12 and which has not been supported by the required reports and • Reject in favour of the approach suggested by the Secretariat (at 60.2 below). The nature of the Caspian Sea sturgeon fishery has changed considerably since the species was listed and many provisions of Res. Conf. 12.7 (Rev. CoP14) on Conservation of and trade in sturgeons and paddlefish are no longer relevant. The Secretariat’s draft decision is more reflective of the current situation and more practical. 60.2 Report of the
The Secretariat reports on changes in international Secretariat
trade in sturgeons and paddlefish, meat and caviar, in the last decade. Exports of wild-sourced specimens have been very significantly reduced in favor of farmed specimens. It notes that Res. Conf. 12.7 (Rev. CoP14) is outdated in places and does not reflect reality, and therefore extensive revisions are COP16 DOCUMENT
RECOMMENDATION
proposed, including a reduction in reporting requirements. 61. Sharks and
• A report on activity in this area since CoP15, PART SUPPORT PART REJECT
stingrays
including engagement with the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations (FAO) and the Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals (CMS). • Two draft decisions relate to the provision of • REJECT the two draft decisions directed to the Secretariat
information by the Parties on national laws and the and the Parties as going beyond the competence of CITES compilation of a single source of information on where more appropriate mechanisms exist. The decisions conservation and management measures by the should be amended to require the Secretariat to negotiate with Secretariat, and engagement of the Parties in the the FAO and CMS for the inclusion of shark conservation and Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species management in negotiated agreed work programmes. of Wild Animals (CMS). • The Secretariat recommends a thorough review of • SUPPORT the proposed amendments to paragraphs 6 and 8
the activities required of the AC by Res. Conf.12.6 of Res. Conf. 12.6 (Rev. CoP15), which will lead to improved (Rev.CoP15) on Conservation and Management of
REJECT the proposed amendment to paragraph 2.
APPOINT A WG to consider a thorough review of Res.
Conf. 12.6 (Rev. CoP15).
COP16 DOCUMENT
RECOMMENDATION
62. Humphead wrasse • CoP15 requested Parties to undertake a range of
measures to implement the inclusion of the Humphead wrass in Appendix II, and required the SC • However, the draft decision is somewhat vague, and it may be to establish a WG to report review actions taken and appropriate for it to be amended to include specific actions. recommend further measures to CoP16.

• A report is given, but the WG was only appointed in
March 2012 and so requests an extension of its
mandate.
63. Toothfish: report
• CCAMLR and CITES co-operate under Res. Conf. NOTE REPORT
of the Commission for 12.4 on Co-operation between CITES and CCAMLR
the Conservation of
regarding trade in toothfish, which requests Parties to • If the issues raised by the CCAMLR Secretariat are accepted, Antarctic Marine
participate in the CCAMLR Catch Documenation they should be incorporated into a series of decisions directed Living Resources
to the Parties, the SC and the Secretariat. (CCAMLR)
• However, there has been very little participation • Reference is made in the report to D. 12.57 to 59, which in from Parties. CCAMLR is therefore asking for improved reporting including voluntary adoption of the Catch Documenation Scheme by Parties. 64. Sea cucumbers
• CoP15 extended a direction to the AC to evaluate the outcomes of the FAO Workshop on Sustainable COP16 DOCUMENT
RECOMMENDATION
Use and Management of Sea Cucumber Fisheries and • The original resolution on sea cucumbers (Res. Conf. 14.100) 65. Regional co-
Proponent: Colombia
NOTE REPORTS
operation on the
management of and
• A report on two workshops held in 2012 on this trade in the queen
species and an invitation to discuss the conch (Strombus
recommendations steps to improve regional gigas)
communication and cooperation in relation to this 66. Madagascar
• CoP15 required the PC and Madagascar to review NOTE REPORT
and gather information on i) succulent taxa proposed for listing but not adopted at CoP15; ii) other species (including tree species) which would benefit from a CITES listing; and iii) identify mechanisms to help
build capacity to carry out non-detriment findings for
currently listed species.

COP16 DOCUMENT
RECOMMENDATION
67. Agarwood-
producing taxa
67.1 Report of the
• CoP15 directed the PC to consider current Plants Committee
definitions of artificially propagated plants and how they apply to trees in mixed species plantations and • It is proposed to extend the application of Res. Conf. SUPPORT
10.13 (Rev. CoP15) on Implementation of the Convention for Timber Species to tree species that are traded not only as timber species, such as the • The PC requests authorisation to conduct a workshop on management of Agarwood taxa, and to assess the applicability of the current definitions of • However, the request regarding assessing the current definitions of artificial propagation seems to be duplication of work already undertaken and contained in the draft resolution for Doc. 67.2, in which case it should be rejected. COP16 DOCUMENT
RECOMMENDATION
67.2 Implementation
Proponents: China, Indonesia, Kuwait and
of the Convention for
Thailand
Agarwood-producing
• However, it appears necessary for a small drafting group to • Following two technical workshops, the PC amend the draft resolution in the light of duplication with Doc. concluded that the current definitions of “artificial propagation” do not apply to mixed species plantations and that the definition of “under controlled conditions” should be amended to include external environmental conditions that occur in tree plantations. • It was also agreed that it would not be appropriate to standardise non-detriment findings for timber species, Prunus africana, medicinal plants and agarwood-producing species. • PC has therefore produced a draft resolution proposing new definitions and guidelines for non-detriment findings for agarwood-producing species. 68. Bigleaf Mahogany
• The PC reports on work in this area since CoP15 and proposes various new decisions directed to the Secretariat and an extension of existing decisions to • However, the existing and proposed new decisions and their permit the renamed WG on Neotropical Tree Species annexes could be recast in a more straighforward manner, COP16 DOCUMENT
RECOMMENDATION
which would greatly assist in clarifying documentation in this important area.

69. Cedrela odorata,
The PC reports on its evaluation of these species NOTE REPORT
Dalbergia retusa,
against the Appendix II criteria as required by Dalbergia granadillo
Decision14.146 (Rev. CoP15). It notes that although and Dalbergia
full data is not available, they might satisfy Criterion stevensonii
B of Annex 2a of Res. Conf. 9.24 (Rev. CoP15). 70. Report of the
The Chairman of the WG reports on activity since NOTE REPORT
Central Africa
Bushmeat Working
AMENDMENT OF
THE APPENDICES
71. Criteria for the
• CoP15 directed the Secretariat, TRAFFIC and the inclusion of (aquatic)
FAO to report on their experiences in applying species in Appendices
Criterion B and the introductory text to Annex 2 a of Res. Conf. 9.24 (Rev. CoP15) to some or all of the commercially exploited aquatic species that have COP16 DOCUMENT
RECOMMENDATION
been proposed at CoPs. SC was directed to report AC recommendations from this exercise to CoP16. • Annex 2 a of Res. Conf. 9.24 (Rev. CoP15) reads as follows: “The following criteria must be read in conjunction with the definitions, explanations and guidelines listed in Annex 5, including the footnote with respect to application of the definition of “decline” for commercially exploited aquatic species. B. It is known, or can be inferred or projected, that regulation of trade in the species is required to ensure that the harvest of specimens from the wild is not reducing the wild population to a level at which its survival might be threatened by continued harvesting or other influences”. • AC findings are annexed to Doc. 71. AC concluded that it is not possible to provide guidance that favors one approach over another, but that in drafting proposals to include aquatic species in Appendix II, proponents should explain their approach to the COP16 DOCUMENT
RECOMMENDATION
criterion, and how the taxon qualifies for inclusion. 72. Criteria related to
• AC was directed by CoP15 to evaluate the merit of ranched populations
reinstating “ranching” as a mechanism for transferring taxa from Appendix I to Appendix II without demonstrating that the Appendix I criteria are
not met and a precautionary safeguard applies.
• AC recommends “ranching” as an alternative mechanism for transferring taxa from Appendix I to • Ranching is an important management strategy for certain Appendix I species to facilitate their recovery and long term • AC also recommends reviewing the two relevant ranching resolutions with a view to incorporating parts as an Annex to Res. Conf. 9.24 (Rev. CoP15). • This would potentially import the very specialised restrictive guidelines of Res. Conf. 9.20 (Rev. CoP15) on Guidelines for evaluating marine turtle ranching proposals into Res. Conf. 11.16 (Rev. CoP15) on Ranching and trade in ranched specimens of species transferred from Appendix I to Appendix II. It would be preferable to keep the two resolutions separate. COP16 DOCUMENT
RECOMMENDATION
73. Consideration of
Proponents: Côte d’ivoire, Liberia, Sierra Leone
SUPPORT IN PART REJECT IN PART
proposals for the
transfer of African
• Res. Conf. 10.9 provides for a report by a panel of elephant populations
experts to be provided to assist Parties in considering from Appendix I to
proposals to transfer populations of African Elephant Appendix II
• It is proposed to amend Res. Conf. 10.9 so that • It would assist the Parties and any proponent to have expert information contained in the panel of experts’ report reports available at an earlier stage, and to make arrangements can be taken into account sufficiently in advance by for earlier delivery of reports and translations is reasonable. However, the suggested amendments not only address this point, but introduce other significant changes that should be rejected. • The recommendation to transfer the costs associated with an amendment proposal to the proponent is not acceptable for any species in the context of a multilateral international convention and should be rejected. • The requirement that certain numbers of experts must come from each African region should be rejected – the experts should be selected on their professional expertise in relation to areas most pertinent to their mandate under Res. Conf. 10.9, wherever they happen to reside. COP16 DOCUMENT
RECOMMENDATION
• Amendment of the resolution should be referred to a WG at the CoP. 74. Periodic Review of
the Appendices:
74.1 Revision of
• The AC and PC have considered how to improve resolution
performance of the Periodic Review of the Appendices. They are recommending changes to Res. • The AC and PC should be permitted to select candidate taxa Conf. 14.8 on Periodic Review of the Appendices and for review and recommend amendment to the Appendices • External funding should not be required for this activity. • Refer the amendment of the resolution to a WG at the CoP. 74.2 Review of the
• CoP13 directed the AC to include Felidae in its Appendices: Felidae
Review of the Appendices. Reviews of Panthera leo, Puma concolor cougar and Puma concolor coryi are ongoing, so the AC recommends extending the validity of Res. Conf. 13.93 (Rev. CoP15) until CoP17. COP16 DOCUMENT
RECOMMENDATION
75. Development and
Proponent: USA (on behalf of the SC)
QUALIFIED SUPPORT
application of
annotations
• A report from the WG on annotations. It • The proposed amendments are complex and it may be recommends amendment of six resolutions to ensure appropriate to refer it to a WG at the CoP. that annotations to future CITES listings are appropriate and can be readily implemented. There are also proposals for a new definitions of “extract”. 76. Annotations –
• CoP15 directed the PC to review and recommend Report of the Plants
amendments to annotations for Appendix II species of Committee
Cactaceae and Orchidaceae and tree species in Appendix II and III to facilitate implemenation. • Definitions of “powder”, “wood chip” and “finished product packaged and ready for retail trade” are proposed. • The PC requests an extension of its mandate in relation to finished products of Cactaceae and Orchidaceae and tree species to CoP17. COP16 DOCUMENT
RECOMMENDATION
77. Proposals to
REFER TO OTHER SECTION OF THIS GUIDE
amend Appendices I
and II

78. Time and venue
NO COMMENT
of the next regular
meeting of the CoP

79. Closing remarks
NO COMMENT

Source: http://member.safariclubfoundation.org/CITES/docs/mar25/English.pdf

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